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St. Augustine; 'Peripatetics'(Aristotelian) = 'Platonists' !

BACK TO: The myth of "Plato v. Aristotle"

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"The monstrously false report that Aristotle was the successor of Socrates and Plato, and also an important original thinker in behalf of scientific knowledge, is entirely a hoax without foundation in fact." (1)
 
"The Irish monks of Iona and St. Augustine are the exemplification of the emergence of European civilization on the foundations of neo-Platonic Christianity. (...) the entirety of the history of European culture from the third century A.D. has centered on an irreconcilable conflict between the republican heritage of Plato and the oligarchical heritage of Aristotle." (2)
 

Here is what St. Augustine himself wrote:

"Despite their true concept of one God, the Platonists countenance polytheism. The reason for my choice of the Platonists, in preference to all others, is that the reputation and prestige they enjoy above the rest is in proportion to the superiority of their concept of one God, the creator of heaven and earth. The judgement of posterity has rated them far above other philosophers; how far is shown by the sequel.
Aristotle (a disciple of Plato and a man of commanding genius, no match for Plato in literary style, but still far above the general run), founded a school called the 'Peripathetics' (the same being derived from his habit of walking about while discussing) and, thanks to his brilliant reputation, attracted to his sect a large number of disciples, even in the lifetime of his teacher. After Plato's death, his nephew Speusippus and his favourite disciple Xenocrates succeeded him in his school, which was called the Academy, and they and their successors were hence called the 'Academics'. In spite of this, the most notable philosophers of recent times have rejected the title 'Peripatetics' or 'Academics', and have elected to be called 'Platonists'."
St. Augustine, City of God, Book VIII, chapter 12

'''So, when St. Augustine considered himself as a "Platonist", that meant BOTH Plato and Aristotle! No Plato v. Aristotle here...

St. Augustine clearly contradicts LaRouche !


Sources:

1. "THE SECRETS KNOWN ONLY TO THE INNER ELITES", by Lyndon H. LaRouche, Jr., in The CAMPAIGNER, Vol. 11, n3-4, May-June 1978.
2. "Preface to "The Final defeat of Ayatollah Khomeini", by Lyndon H. LaRouche, Jr., 1982.

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Page last modified on August 31, 2012, at 12:16 PM